About Professor Siegel

Professor of Informatics
Director of Graduate Studies, Informatics
School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering
Professor of Cognitive Science
Professor of Instructional Systems Technology (Education)

msiegel@indiana.edu
(812) 856-1103
Informatics West 211

Marty is a Professor of Informatics, Education, and Cognitive Science. From 1991-1999 he was the director of research and development at the Center for Excellence in Education. In this context, he founded Indiana University’s first startup company, WisdomTools (founded in 1999). His current research focuses on slow change interaction design and design pedagogy. He’s working on a new book, tentatively titled The Design Habit: From Non-Designer to Designer.

Education

Ph.D. in Educational Psychology at Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1973

Research Areas

Design of Digital Learning Environments, Design Pedagogy, Human Centered Computing, Human Computer Interaction Design, Slow Change Interaction Design, and Teaching and Learning.
Courses Taught (each year):
  • I541: Interaction Design Practice
  • I590: Rapid Design for Slow Change
  • I300: Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction Design
  • I441: Undergraduate Interaction Design Practice
What was one of the most engaging conferences you attended?

I tend to avoid the big conferences like CHI; I leave these conferences to my younger colleagues and students. (Frankly, sometimes these large conferences feel like 4,000 people talking and no one listening!) What I do enjoy attending are smaller venues like DRS or even “by invitation only” conferences like a recent one in Nottingham, England where only about a dozen researchers attended. I find these to be most engaging.

What associations do you belong to? What conferences do you attend?

ACM-SIGCHI, CAA (College Art Association), & DRS (Design Research Society)

What methods do you favor in your work?

This may sound a bit impertinent, but I employ the methods that fit the research’s context. In my early years as a researcher, my methods were mostly statistical and experimental (multivariate analysis of variance, regression analysis, factor analysis, etc.), but more recently I’m attracted to single- to few-subject analyses that are more ethnographic and qualitative.

What are some of your personal interests or activities that may or may not overlap with research?

I’ve always had an entrepreneurial spirit. I’ve launched two companies (WisdomTools was IU’s first spin-out in 1999, and Glerb was launched a few years ago). And I enjoy doing the same thing academically: the HCI Design Master’s program in 2001, and this year working (with Christena and others) on the design of a new undergraduate degree focusing on interaction/experience design (a collaboration between SICE and the School of Art, Architecture, and Design).

What is in the 5-year plan, or what is something you haven’t got around to doing yet?

The next five years or less will be the formal culmination of my career. It forces one to think about legacy. For me, it’s less about my “final h-index” and more about the impact I’ve had on countless numbers of students. I hope people will talk about me as teacher, mentor, and administrator — someone with head and heart. And if my ideas have impacted others in the fields of design and education, so much the better.